Average weather in Cambodia
fckyeahbabies:

Cambodia :)

fckyeahbabies:

Cambodia :)

sweet-nothings-:

omg so was going to buy her little elephant bag from CAMBODIA

sweet-nothings-:

omg so was going to buy her little elephant bag from CAMBODIA

selva:

In a study published in the August 24 Nature, researchers from Princeton University and Columbia University’s Earth Institute looked at the impact of the El Nino climate cycle on civil conflict over the past half-century. (Quick background: El Nino is one half of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation cycle, or ENSO, which involves the periodic warming and cooling of the tropical Pacific Ocean. The El Nino phase—which occurs every three to seven years—tends to bring unusually high temperatures and dry weather to tropical countries.) The Nature researchers found that the arrival of an El Nino phase doubled the risk of civil conflict across 90 affected tropical countries, and may help account for a fifth of worldwide conflicts over the past half-century. “This is the first major evidence that the global climate is a major factor in organized violence around the world,” says Solomon Hsiang, an expert in sustainable development and the study’s lead author.

 Scientists and writers have suspected that strong climatic or environmental change can trigger conflict, and even cause societies to fall. In his great book Collapse, Jared Diamond argued that unusually long and punishing droughts—in addition to population pressures—may have helped virtually wipe out the Anasazi Indians in the American Southwest. Other researchers have used proxy measures for climate change—like tree rings or titanium sediments in the ocean—to match extreme climatic events with the collapse of ancient civilizations, including the MayaAngkor in Cambodia and Mesopotamia’s Akkadian empire. More recently, the author Mike Davis made a controversial case that persistent, El Nino-influenced famines in the late 19th century—along with colonial mismanagement—effectively crippled what we’d eventually come to refer to as the developing world.

But Hsiang and his colleagues say they’ve managed to nail down a more persuasive case with current data, arguing that climate changes can still have a strong effect on conflict even in the modern era, when we’re more insulated from the effects of weather. The researchers tracked El Nino from 1950 to 2004 and correlated it with onsets of civil conflicts that killed more than 25 people in a given year. (Altogether their data set included 175 countries and 234 conflicts.) For tropical nations affected by the El Nino cycle, they found that the chance of civil war breaking out during an El Nino was 6%, double the chance during La Nina years. (La Nina is the flip side of the El Nino cycle.) Overall, they calculated that El Nino may play a role in nearly 30% of the civil conflicts in countries strongly affected by the cycle. “We’re showing that global climate influences local conflict,” says Hsiang.

**READ MORE**

thatwasnotveryravenofyou:

This is my far-too-long review and analysis of ‘Asuncion’, written by Jesse Eisenberg and directed by Kip Fagan. Be aware there are many spoilers, and I even discuss the ending, so please do not read this if you don’t wish to know anything that occurs in the show. Also please be aware this is a…

wetheurban:

COCO ROCHA FOR CAMBODIA

Coco Rocha may have been a tad bit absent from the catwalk this season, but she definitely hasn’t been relaxing on the couch. The supermodel prodigy has been busy crafting a line of jewelry for Senhoa.org that ranges from $65-$995 that benefits victims of human trafficking attacks in Cambodia. Shot in that amazing cinemagraph form by friend of WeTheUrban, Jamie Beck (who is also featured in the latest edition of WeTheUrban Magazine), the line consists of bracelets, earrings, and dazzling Swarovski necklaces. Perfection!

seethebeautyinhersmile:

Children in Ou village, Cambodia show their delight while playing with fresh water at a pumping well. Wells such as this assist poorer communities by not only providing clean drinking water but also reducing the time it takes in gathering and collecting water which is a task often left for woman and children.Find out more about how we work with communities on water, sanitation and hygiene http://bit.ly/fg7nRn

seethebeautyinhersmile:

Children in Ou village, Cambodia show their delight while playing with fresh water at a pumping well. Wells such as this assist poorer communities by not only providing clean drinking water but also reducing the time it takes in gathering and collecting water which is a task often left for woman and children.

Find out more about how we work with communities on water, sanitation and hygiene http://bit.ly/fg7nRn

terrestrial-noesis:

Ta Prohm Temple, Cambodia